Holly Blue

Celastrina argiolus (61.012)

The Holly Blue is frequently seen in suburban gardens where its larval foodplants (Holly and Ivy) occur. In flight, it has a silvery appearance.

The adult Holly Blue emerges early in spring, well before any other blue butterflies. Unlike other blues, the Holly Blue tends to fly high up around trees and bushes in full sunlight. The males can sometimes be found at ground level taking salts from dried up puddles in summer.

Habitat Requirements

The Holly Blue can be found almost anywhere, even in city centres. Gardens, public parks, disused railway lines, hedgerows, field margins and woodland rides where both Ivy and Holly (the larval foodplants) can be found are the best places to find this butterfly.

Larval Foodplants

The larvae of the Holly Blue feed on Holly (Ilex aquifolium) and Ivy (Hedera helix). In the spring, eggs are laid and larvae feed on developing flower buds and berries of Holly from April to early June while in the autumn, eggs are laid and larvae feed on developing flower buds and berries of Ivy between August and mid to late September.

Garden Tips

Growing a Holly (Ilex aquifolium) and Ivy (Hedera helix) bush in your garden will be highly attractive to this species. The Holly Blue is easy to encourage to breed in suburban gardens.

Distribution in Warwickshire

See maps below. Distribution text required.

Distribution of the Holly Blue 1995-2004 inclusive

1995-2004

Distribution of the Holly Blue 2005-2009 inclusive

2005-2009

Distribution of the Holly Blue 2010-2014 inclusive

2010-2014

Distribution of the Holly Blue 2015-2019 inclusive

2015-2019

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